Honey Ant - A2 Print

Honey Ant A2.jpg
moth and ant edited.jpg
Honey Ant A2.jpg
moth and ant edited.jpg

Honey Ant - A2 Print

170.00

Camponotus Inflatus

Easily identified by its enlarged abdomen containing ‘honey’, the honey ant has six legs, and three parts to its body (head, thorax, abdomen). Honey ants are ants that have been engorged with food by worker ants, so much so, that their abdomens swell, functioning as a living larder. The ants are fed by the collected honeydew made by the red mulga lerp, Austrotachardia acaciae (Kurkunytjungu).

The sweet nectar of the honey ants makes it one of the popular bush tucker items eaten by the First Peoples of Australia, especially in Central Australia and the Northern Territory. The honey ants dig deep underground tunnels and chambers forming nests below specific mulga trees. The nests can be up to two metres deep and are usually found on the shady side of the tree.

The local Indigenous women search for the nests of the honey ants by locating the drill holes under the trees that give away their presence. Using their wooden digging sticks, now often replaced by shovels and metal bars, the women dig down, following the honey ants’ tunnels or nyinantu, until they find the ants, which are collected in coolamons or carrying vessels.

The honey ant is a popular symbol depicted in Indigenous art work.

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Original pen and ink drawing printed onto 310gsm Canson Aquarelle Rag using archival inks and is signed by the artist, Phoebe Duff.

All Ancient Nectar prints are limited editions of 25 and are numbered in the bottom left corner.

*Please allow 2-3 weeks delivery time for limited edition items, as they are printed to order.

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